Newsweek Magazine
Newsweek Magazine
Newsweek magazine is a renowned American news magazine which is printed from the capital city of New York and distributed internationally. It is among the "Big Three" daily news magazines which have one of the largest circulations within the US. The magazine was introduced it's founders in the year 1933 with the initial name of News-week. However, it later changed its name Newsweek in 1937 after it was merged to Today magazine. It was during this time that Newsweek began to stand out from its peers by adopting a more liberal approach but nevertheless, it maintained a more serious tone and focused on in-depth analysis. It was also at this period when Newsweek identified and targeted readers outside the United States by launching its international edition. In the 1950s when Civil rights movements as well as questions on race equality were some of the most popular topics for Americans, Newsweek is renowned as one of the papers that took the issue of discrimination based on race by dedicating a large part of each publication to issues of race and diversity. The liberal bent may have played a significant role in the acquisition of Newsweek by the Washington Post in 1961 proving to be an almost perfect match between both publications. Katherine Graham, the Washington Post's famous owner at the time, tried to encourage Newsweek even more on the more liberal side. Visit:- https://www.resticmagazine.com/ By the middle of the 1960's, Newsweek was in the forefront in the debate over this controversial Vietnam War by pushing the boundaries of advocacy journalism. In contrast to the traditional model of journalism is based on objective reporting, where facts are presented , and the audience is left to interpret the facts in its own way, in advocacy journalism the reporters incorporate their personal views to the story e.g. declaring that a particular action is not right and then stating what must be done to correct the mistake. This type of journalism called advocacy journalism was not well-known as a concept, nor was it widely used in the early days. While Newsweek is not necessarily credited with being the first newspaper to develop advocacy journalism the large readership of the paper was instrumental in encouraging the practice of advocacy journalism within the main stream media. Perhaps one of the most famous instances of advocacy journalism that came from Newsweek in the early days was a story they ran on the Vietnam War where the magazine presented its argument on what it believed the War was unnecessary and that withdrawing was the most beneficial decision to take. The scope of Newsweek today is miles ahead of where it was in the past. At the time of its 2005 launch, Newsweek had a 20 million strong audience across the United States alone and a world readership of 26, million that was spread across 190 countries. The magazine is now available in other languages, and has four regional editions dubbed Atlantic, Latin America Asia and Australia. In the same way that many of the most prestigious magazines and newspaper houses fumbled over whether or not to take on or not to resist technological advances, Newsweek was again one of the first to take an unassuming step into the digital unknown with the introduction of an electronic version on CD-ROM in the 1990s and distributed it to its subscribers quarterly.

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