The US Environmental Protection Agency
The US Environmental Protection Agency
The United States' Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA is a federal body that controls everything from asbestos to air and water contaminants that could harm our health. As its name implies, the EPA also works to protect the environment from harm. The EPA was created in July of 1970, as a result of people's demands for cleaner water and air and also the regulation of the land. The 2nd day of December, 1970 the EPA officially opened its office, where it is able to consolidate a wide range of different tasks and information to achieve its purpose of protecting us as well as the environment. The EPA functions as a center of research information monitor equipment, and setting standards. Additionally, this agency works to ensure that its standards are adhered to. This governmental organization has enacted numerous programs to protect the earth the air, water, endangered species, and to manage harmful waste. In the beginning, you've likely been aware of the Energy Star program, which makes use of financial rebates as well as other incentives to encourage people to take voluntary actions to help make their lives more efficient on energy. It encompasses everything from home appliances to appliances technology to the lighting. The next project is to manage pesticides. All pesticides legally sold throughout the United States must be registered under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide floating oil skimmer, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). A pesticide can only be offered for sale after extensive research of the chemical and, even then, it can only be sold to certified pesticide handlers. If you've ever purchased an auto then you've probably noted the estimated mileage per gallon produced by the car. This figure is provided by EPA. At first, the organization conducted real-world tests on driving, however, it now works by taking emissions from cars. Because the conditions for driving have changed so drastically since the initial testing customers often find out how much MPG actually is less than what was estimated. Lastly, an important law that is controlled by EPA can be found in the Safe Drinking Water Act, which was passed in December of 1974. The SDWA allows for the surveillance of the water supply to the public (not drinking water containers) in order to guard against drinking contaminants. The EPA tests for lead levels in the water, and bacteria. Furthermore, it analyzes the amount of asbestos present in the water. When asbestos is present inside drinking water individuals may inhale the fibers. The asbestos fibers can become trapped in the tissues of the digestive tract, which may cause cancers, such as gastroesophageal, gastrointestinal and colorectal. If you or someone is aware of someone who was exposed to an unapproved amount of asbestos, leading to health problems, it is recommended to speak to an attorney about your options.  

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